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Records - 1531 to 1540 of 1542
Author: Irving, Henry
Address: Queen's Hotel, Manchester (Tour 1888 paper)
Recipient: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: -
Date: 1888, Oct., 27 
Document Type: Letter (8 p.)
Content Summary: He discusses a scandal caused by the stage manager Charles Harris and chorus girls, but this cannot be said to represent the theatre as a whole. Serious actor managers do artistic work and conduct their theatres well. Irving would not have bothered with the attacks of Moore and Quilter if they had not been disseminated so widely, and inspired similar writings from [E. St J.] Brenon, C.S[cott], and Mr [H.A.] Jones bewailing the decline of the theatre. Can Burnand give him a few hints, - he is to have a public breakfast in Birmingham. He refers to Willard & S.T. Florrie Toole is ill with gout in Edinburgh and Johnnie has been anxious. (Postscript) Why don't some of Burnand's girls call on Ellen Terry at ... Cliftonville, Margate. It would delight her to see them.
Published: L. Irving, p.496-97(with omission).
Notes: Charles Harris was a young stage manager working with Henry Pettitt and George R. Sims at the Gaiety Theatre. Harry Quilter (as Irving mentions, once engaged to the actress Miss Fortescue) was editor of the 'Universal Review' which published an attack on the theatre by George Moore. A typewritten transcript is at DUL Add. Ms.832/14.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/1/28)
Ref.No: 1042    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 64, Russell Square, W.C.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1877, April, 11 
Document Type: Letter (2 p.)
Content Summary: He hopes Irving's idea of the third murderer will not make him deny Burnand's theory in that week's 'Punch'. P.S. Where are the 'Flying Dutchman' notes? Was it dropped? It is right to do a version of 'The Courier of Lyons' for a change.
Published: -
Notes: Written sideways from a new address on paper headed: The Dukes Theatre, which is crossed out. The casting of the third murderer is a significant point in productions of 'Macbeth'. 'The Lyons Mail' was to open at the Lyceum on May 19th, and 'Vanderdecken' was not produced until June 8th, 1878. Possibly Burnand had contributed some notes for Irving.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8689    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 64, Russell Square, W.C.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1880, Feb., 28 
Document Type: Letter (2 p.)
Content Summary: The idea Irving grasped would be better published in 'Theatre' as a Shakespearian mystery. 'Coriolanus' in three years, and probably 'The Isle of St Tropez'. He will get the French original used by him and Montagu Williams when they were young, revise it and make a first rate play. There is a wonderful role for Ellen Terry with becoming costumes.
Published: -
Notes: Burnand's idea is probably not still his article on the third murderer mentioned in Letter 8689. 'Coriolanus' was announced in 1880 but not performed until 1901; Irving encouraged the rewriting of Burnand and Williams' play first performed in 1860, but never performed it. There are many references to it in his letters.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8694    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 10 Bouverie Street, Fleet Street (written); Whitefriars, London (printed)
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1881, July, 15 
Document Type: Letter (1 p.)
Content Summary: He asks permission to bring some of his party with him on Sunday: [John] Toole, also [John] Tenniel, [Fred?] Storey, & [Charles] Coghlan.
Published: -
Notes: This is the dinner to the Saxe-Meiningen Company at the Lyceum on 17th July or perhaps a related reception.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8695    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 64, Russell Square, W.C.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1881, Dec., 22 
Document Type: Letter (2 p.)
Content Summary: Stoker and Hurst have written about Monday, but it is Boxing Day and devoted to pantomime, at Drury Lane especially. He jokes about 'Two Roses' as a pantomime, referring to David James and suggesting Mrs Langtry as Columbine. He does not expect Irving will speak, but will let him know about 'The Colonel'. He wishes 'Two Roses' success but would prefer "more art".
Published: -
Notes: The answer to Letter 1014. 26th December was the first night of the light comedy 'Two Roses'. Burnand presumably always took his young daughters to the pantomime.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8696    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 64, Russell Square, W.C.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1882, Oct., 7 
Document Type: Letter (6 p.)
Content Summary: He jokes about Irving's intentions in kissing his hand from the stage to his daughter Zita. With a new production coming he discusses at length Shakespearian production for a Victorian audience as opposed to an Elizabethan, proving that he and Irving do not disagree. Some plays must be cut or scenes rearranged to speed the action. 'Much Ado' will not require much cutting. With some exceptions: Mathias, Hamlet, Richard and Louis XI, comedy is Irving's stronger point, and also Ellen Terry's. He predicts great success for 'Much Ado'. He had just detected some uncomfortable opinion in Irving's last speech, and hopes Irving will sometime clarify his views. He does care about Poetic Drama but not Tennyson's plays. Only [Alfred] Austin's 'Savonarola' is worse and more historically faulty than Tennyson's 'Queen Mary', the latter's best play 'The Cup' failed at the climax and his comedy is rubbish.
Published: -
Notes: 'Much Ado About Nothing' was to open on 11th October. Burnand thanks Irving for entertaining his wife and children at the theatre, probably to see 'Romeo and Juliet'.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8697    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: -
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1883, July, 11 
Document Type: Letter (4 p.)
Content Summary: Let them discuss [his play] before Irving leaves for America; he can get down to work and Irving can produce it when he likes. At considerable length he describes how Arthur Stirling had insisted Burnand was an actor (it had been only in exceptional circumstances in the country) to make him contribute to the subscription for the actor J.B. Johnston. Only H.J. Byron, who was too ill anyway, was, like him, excluded from the celebration supper, and Burnand is aggrieved.
Published: -
Notes: Burnand continued to press Irving about his play 'The Isle of St Tropez'. The actor and dramatist John Beer Johnston or Johnstone, d.1891.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8700    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 64, Russell Square, W.C.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: 1882, Oct., 23 
Document Type: Letter (2 p.)
Content Summary: Thanks for an excellent evening, with Stanley enjoyable on Livingstone and then on himself. Burnand wants to go again to 'Much Ado' as soon as he can. He supposes many others have suggested Malvolio to Irving but thinks casting the twins might be a difficulty. He lists the cast he saw in [Charles] Kean's production: Mrs Kean and Cathcart, not Rowley, as the twins; Sir Andrew &c were Keeley, Addison & Alfred Wigan, with Mrs Keeley and later Mrs Wigan as Maria. Meadows as Malvolio was a mistake.
Published: -
Notes: Irving produced 'Twelfth Night' in July 1884, but it was not regarded as a success.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8699    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: 192, Brompton Road, S.W.
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: [New York?]
Date: 1885, March, 21 
Document Type: Letter (6+ p.)
Content Summary: Thanks for the cheque. He will get to work on 'The Isle of St Tropez' the next month. When begin 'The Vicar' and 'Henry VIII'? He considers 'Becket' lightweight and John Toole agreed. Burnand's article in 'The Fortnightly' was an answer to Mrs Kendal's snobbish speech about the theatre at Birmingham, and critics like Toole and Mrs Bancroft had come round to Burnand's opinion. Burnand was astonished at Irving's reported remarks, bringing in Burnand's wife, and was relieved to find this was a completely false report in the press. Has Irving denied it in the N[ew] Y[ork] T[imes]? Irving probably knows what will happen at the Princess's and St James [theatres] but not at the Lyceum. Some people are going to give Irving another dinner on his return. he will be hungry after the voyage and Burnand will come if ...
Published: -
Notes: The end of the letter is missing. 'Olivia', a version of 'The Vicar of Wakefield' opened on 5th September and was followed by 'Faust' which ran until July 1887, by which time Irving's plans had changed. 'Henry VIII' was not staged until January 1892. Madge Kendal's lecture 'The Drama', 1884, was highly controversial. While Irving was in America the Lyceum was occupied by Mary Anderson.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8702    
Author: Burnand, Francis Cowley
Address: Albion Club, Ramsgate
Recipient: Irving, Henry
Address: -
Date: [1888], Oct., 22 
Document Type: Letter (4 p.)
Content Summary: He welcomes 'Macbeth' but not at the expense of his 'The Isle of St Tropez' which has roles for Alexander and Willard. He suggests Henry Neville might be Irving's Macduff, which is really Bancroft's idea, but Irving might not agree. (Postscript:) No more whisky. Does Irving consider the Gaiety Company a respectable one? He has heard complaints about Charles Harris's language which Sims and Pettitt put up with, but the girls are obliged to put up with it and Burnand thinks this gradually corrupts respectably brought up girls.
Published: -
Notes: 'Macbeth' opened at the Lyceum on 29th December 1888 with George Alexander as Macduff. The reference to Henry Neville may be a joke, and the reference to whisky is obscure. Charles Harris the stage manager caused controversy about his behaviour to the chorus in the Gaiety Company, managed by George Sims and Henry Pettitt. Irving's reply is Letter 1042.
Document Holder: THM (Reference: THM/37/7/19)
Ref.No: 8705    
Records - 1531 to 1540 of 1542